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What Is Lustre Doing In Politics?

What Is Lustre Doing In Politics?

 

We have been writing more about political matters lately than we expected when we started Lustre. And we have been challenged by some readers who think this should not be a political site, but should rather stick to its knitting--figuring out how to improve the image of retired career women so they can feel better about themselves and others will value their participation in the world.

We see no dichotomy. Politics infuses everything, whether in the home, on the job or on a broader stage. Whenever we wish to influence another person in a position of power, we act politically. By asserting that retired career women should be valued, we are being political. Just as when we argued that women were entitled to equal consideration and pay at work.   

We are alarmed by the first days of the Trump presidency. Our old protester instincts have awakened, strongly. Donald Trump's policies are, in many ways, an affront to our most basic principles of equity, equality, and decency. When he was elected, Lustre advocated that he be given a chance. With the inaugural speech and the events of his first days, especially the travel ban, we are losing hope that his administration will turn to an agenda, and to language, that reflect the core principles and values of our democracy. 

So, yes, Lustre, which reflects matters we think are of interest or importance to retired professional women, will continue to address politics. We need to be part of the world, to stand up and be heard. We are free to speak our minds, without fear or favor. Yes, it is time for the next generations to take over. But our voices matter too.  

If we unite and exercise our power, we can and will return to a government of hope, not fear, and inclusion, not isolation, and bring our country back to a place where we can all rise together. 

Clothes For Our New Phase

Clothes For Our New Phase

Viewpoints (Marlene): Lessons from the State Department

Viewpoints (Marlene): Lessons from the State Department